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Int J Audiol. 2015 Feb;54 Suppl 1:S30-6. doi: 10.3109/14992027.2014.981305. Epub 2014 Dec 30.

Does tinnitus, hearing asymmetry, or hearing loss predispose to occupational injury risk?

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  • 1* Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program, Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the relative contributions of tinnitus, asymmetrical hearing loss, low frequency hearing loss (pure tone average of 0.5, 1, 2, 3 kHz; PTA.5123), or high frequency hearing loss (pure tone average of 4, 6 kHz; PTA46), to acute injury risk among a cohort of production and maintenance workers at six aluminum manufacturing plants, adjusting for ambient noise exposure and other recognized predictors of injury risk.

DESIGN:

Retrospective analysis.

STUDY SAMPLE:

The study considered 9920 workers employed during 2003 to 2008. The cohort consisted of 8818 workers (89%) whose complete records were available.

RESULTS:

Adjusting for noise exposure and other recognized injury predictors, a 25% increased acute injury risk was observed among workers with a history of tinnitus in conjunction with high-frequency hearing loss (PTA46). Low frequency hearing loss may be associated with minor, yet less serious, injury risk. We did not find evidence that asymmetry contributes to injury risk.

CONCLUSION:

These results provide evidence that tinnitus, combined with high-frequency hearing loss, may pose an important safety threat to workers, especially those who work in high-noise exposed environments. These at risk workers may require careful examination of their communication and hearing protection needs.

KEYWORDS:

Tinnitus; hearing asymmetry; hearing loss; workplace health and safety

PMID:
25549168
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4342233
Free PMC Article
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