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J Clin Oncol. 2015 Feb 1;33(4):319-25. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2014.57.8088. Epub 2014 Dec 15.

Lynch syndrome caused by germline PMS2 mutations: delineating the cancer risk.

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  • 1Sanne W. ten Broeke, Carli M. Tops, Heleen M. van der Klift, Manon Suerink, Frederik J. Hes, Hans F. Vasen, Maartje Nielsen, and Juul T. Wijnen, Leiden University Medical Center; Hans F. Vasen, The Netherlands Foundation for the Detection of Hereditary Tumors, Leiden; Richard M. Brohet, Research Center Linnaeus Institute, Spaarne Hospital, Hoofddorp; Mary E. Velthuizen and Tom G.W. Letteboer, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht; Encarna Gomez Garcia, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht; Nicoline Hoogerbrugge, Arjen R. Mensenkamp, and Liesbeth Spruijt, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen; Fred H. Menko, Vrije Universiteit, University Medical Center; Theo A. van Os and Bert J.W. Redeker, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam; Rolf H. Sijmons and Yvonne J. Vos, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen; Anja Wagner, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Inge Bernstein, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg; Inge Bernstein, Danish Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Registry, Hvidovre University Hospital Copenhagen, Denmark; Gabriel Capellá Munar, Hereditary Cancer Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology-Institut D'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge, l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain; Annika Lindblom, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna; Pal Moller, Research Group Inherited Cancer, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; and Nils Rahner, Institute of Human Genetics, University of Dusseldorf, Dusseldorf, Germany. tenbroeke@lumc.nl.
  • 2Sanne W. ten Broeke, Carli M. Tops, Heleen M. van der Klift, Manon Suerink, Frederik J. Hes, Hans F. Vasen, Maartje Nielsen, and Juul T. Wijnen, Leiden University Medical Center; Hans F. Vasen, The Netherlands Foundation for the Detection of Hereditary Tumors, Leiden; Richard M. Brohet, Research Center Linnaeus Institute, Spaarne Hospital, Hoofddorp; Mary E. Velthuizen and Tom G.W. Letteboer, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht; Encarna Gomez Garcia, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht; Nicoline Hoogerbrugge, Arjen R. Mensenkamp, and Liesbeth Spruijt, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen; Fred H. Menko, Vrije Universiteit, University Medical Center; Theo A. van Os and Bert J.W. Redeker, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam; Rolf H. Sijmons and Yvonne J. Vos, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen; Anja Wagner, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Inge Bernstein, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg; Inge Bernstein, Danish Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Registry, Hvidovre University Hospital Copenhagen, Denmark; Gabriel Capellá Munar, Hereditary Cancer Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology-Institut D'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge, l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain; Annika Lindblom, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna; Pal Moller, Research Group Inherited Cancer, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; and Nils Rahner, Institute of Human Genetics, University of Dusseldorf, Dusseldorf, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers.

METHODS:

Data were collected from 98 PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers.

RESULTS:

The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52 years, and there was a significant difference in mean age of CRC between the probands (mean, 47 years; range, 26 to 68 years) and other family members with a PMS2 mutation (mean, 58 years; range, 31 to 86 years; P < .001). Significant SIRs were observed for cancers of the small bowel, ovaries, breast, and renal pelvis.

CONCLUSION:

CRC and EC risks were found to be markedly lower than those previously reported for the other MMR. However, these risks embody the isolated risk of carrying a PMS2 mutation, and it should be noted that we observed a substantial variation in cancer phenotype within and between families, suggesting the influence of genetic modifiers and lifestyle factors on cancer risks.

© 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

PMID:
25512458
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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