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Hypertension. 2015 Feb;65(2):313-9. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04261. Epub 2014 Dec 8.

Exposure to bisphenol A from drinking canned beverages increases blood pressure: randomized crossover trial.

Author information

  • 1From the Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health Center, College of Medicine (S.B., Y.-C.H.), and Institute of Environmental Medicine, Medical Research Center (Y.-C.H.), Seoul National University, Jongrogu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
  • 2From the Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health Center, College of Medicine (S.B., Y.-C.H.), and Institute of Environmental Medicine, Medical Research Center (Y.-C.H.), Seoul National University, Jongrogu, Seoul, Republic of Korea. ychong1@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical used in plastic bottles and inner coating of beverage cans, and its exposure is almost ubiquitous. BPA has been associated with hypertension and decreased heart rate variability in the previous studies. The aim of the present study was to determine whether increased BPA exposure from consumption of canned beverage actually affects blood pressure and heart rate variability. We conducted a randomized crossover trial with noninstitutionalized adults, who were aged ≥60 years and recruited from a local community center. A total of 60 participants visited the study site 3 times, and they were provided the same beverage in 2 glass bottles, 2 cans, or 1 can and 1 glass bottle at a time. The sequence of the beverage was randomized. We then measured urinary BPA concentration, blood pressure, and heart rate variability 2 hours after the consumption of each beverage. The paired t test and mixed model were used to compare the differences. The urinary BPA concentration increased after consuming canned beverages by >1600% compared with that after consuming glass bottled beverages. Systolic blood pressure adjusted for daily variance increased by ≈4.5 mm Hg after consuming 2 canned beverages compared with that after consuming 2 glass bottled beverages, and the difference was statistically significant. The parameters of the heart rate variability did not show statistically significant differences.The present study demonstrated that consuming canned beverage and consequent increase of BPA exposure increase blood pressure acutely.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02096991.

© 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

aging; bisphenol A; blood pressure; crossover trials

PMID:
25489056
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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