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Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2015 Aug;54(9):871-7. doi: 10.1177/0009922814561742. Epub 2014 Dec 5.

Fast Food Consumption and Academic Growth in Late Childhood.

Author information

  • 1The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA purtell.15@osu.edu.
  • 2The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study is to examine the associations between fast food consumption and the academic growth of 8544 fifth-grade children in reading, math, and science.

METHOD:

This study uses direct assessments of academic achievement and child-reported fast food consumption from a nationally representative sample of kindergartners followed through eighth grade.

RESULTS:

More than two thirds of the sample reported some fast food consumption; 20% reported consuming at least 4 fast food meals in the prior week. Fast food consumption during fifth grade predicted lower levels of academic achievement in all 3 subjects in eighth grade, even when fifth grade academic scores and numerous potential confounding variables, including socioeconomic indicators, physical activity, and TV watching, were controlled for in the models.

CONCLUSION:

These results provide initial evidence that high levels of fast food consumption are predictive of slower growth in academic skills in a nationally representative sample of children.

© The Author(s) 2014.

KEYWORDS:

academic achievement; child development; cognitive development; fast food

PMID:
25480321
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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