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Science. 2014 Nov 21;346(6212):996-1000. doi: 10.1126/science.1256427.

Antibody landscapes after influenza virus infection or vaccination.

Author information

  • 1Center for Pathogen Evolution, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK. World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Modeling, Evolution, and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK. Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3015 CE, Netherlands.
  • 2Center for Pathogen Evolution, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK. World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Modeling, Evolution, and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK.
  • 3Oxford University Clinical Research Unit and Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Hanoi, Vietnam.
  • 4Center for Pathogen Evolution, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK.
  • 5WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza, Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia.
  • 6National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Hanoi, Vietnam.
  • 7Oxford University Museum of Natural History, Oxford OX1 3PW, UK.
  • 8Insect Biomechanics Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK.
  • 9Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3015 CE, Netherlands.
  • 10World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Modeling, Evolution, and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK. Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK.
  • 11bobblewire.com, Saint Louis, MO 63112, USA.
  • 12Abbott Laboratories, Weesp 1380 DA, Netherlands.
  • 13Oxford University Clinical Research Unit and Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Hanoi, Vietnam. Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Centre for Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN, UK.
  • 14WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza, Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia. Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010, Australia.
  • 15Center for Pathogen Evolution, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK. World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Modeling, Evolution, and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK. Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam 3015 CE, Netherlands. dsmith@zoo.cam.ac.uk.

Abstract

We introduce the antibody landscape, a method for the quantitative analysis of antibody-mediated immunity to antigenically variable pathogens, achieved by accounting for antigenic variation among pathogen strains. We generated antibody landscapes to study immune profiles covering 43 years of influenza A/H3N2 virus evolution for 69 individuals monitored for infection over 6 years and for 225 individuals pre- and postvaccination. Upon infection and vaccination, titers increased broadly, including previously encountered viruses far beyond the extent of cross-reactivity observed after a primary infection. We explored implications for vaccination and found that the use of an antigenically advanced virus had the dual benefit of inducing antibodies against both advanced and previous antigenic clusters. These results indicate that preemptive vaccine updates may improve influenza vaccine efficacy in previously exposed individuals.

Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

PMID:
25414313
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4246172
Free PMC Article
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