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Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2014 Nov 3:0. [Epub ahead of print]

The Role of Nutrients in Protecting Mitochondrial Function and Neurotransmitter Signaling: Implications for the Treatment of Depression, PTSD, and Suicidal Behaviors.

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  • 1a Yunnan University , School of Medicine , 2 Cuihu North Road, Kunming , Yunnan , China 650091.

Abstract

ABSTRACT Numerous studies have linked severe stress to the development of major depressive disorder (MDD), and suicidal behaviors. Furthermore, recent preclinical studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that in rodents, chronic stress and the stress hormone cortisol has caused oxidative damage to mitochondrial function and membrane lipids in the brain. Mitochondria play a key role in synaptic neurotransmitter signaling by providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP), mediating lipid and protein synthesis, buffering intracellular calcium, and regulating apoptotic and resilience pathways. Membrane lipids are similarly essential to central nervous system (CNS) function, because cholesterol, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and sphingolipids form a lipid raft region, a special lipid region on the membrane that mediates neurotransmitter signaling through G-protein coupled receptors and ion channels. Low serum cholesterol levels, low antioxidant capacity, and abnormal early morning cortisol levels are biomarkers consistently associated with both depression and suicidal behaviors. In this review, we summarize the manner in which nutrients can protect against oxidative damage to mitochondria and lipids in the neuronal circuits associated with cognitive and affective behaviors. These nutrients include ω3 fatty acids, antioxidants (vitamin C and zinc), members of the vitamin B family (Vitamin B12 and folic acid) and magnesium. Accumulating data have shown that these nutrients can enhance neurocognitive function, and may have therapeutic benefits for depression and suicidal behaviors. A growing body of studies suggests the intriguing possibility that regular consumption of these nutrients may help prevent the onset of mood disorders and suicidal behaviors in vulnerable individuals, or significantly augment the therapeutic effect of available antidepressants. These findings have important implications for the health of both military and civilian populations.

KEYWORDS:

lipid; oxidative stress; suicide; synaptic plasticity; vitamin; zinc

PMID:
25365455
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
PMCID:
PMC4417658
Free PMC Article
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