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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015 Jan;24(1):291-7. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0636. Epub 2014 Oct 9.

Dietary intake of acrylamide and epithelial ovarian cancer risk in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

Author information

  • 1Unit of Nutrition, Environment, and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
  • 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
  • 3Dietary Exposure Assessment Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
  • 4Inserm, Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones, and Women's Health team, Villejuif, France. Univ Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. IGR, Villejuif, France.
  • 5Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Australia.
  • 6Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
  • 7Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany.
  • 8Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • 9Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
  • 10Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain.
  • 11Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (Granada.ibs), Granada, Spain. Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
  • 12Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa-BIODONOSTIA, Basque Regional Health Department, Spain.
  • 13Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, Murcia, Spain.
  • 14Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
  • 15University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
  • 16MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
  • 17Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
  • 18Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
  • 19Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece.
  • 20Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • 21Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology, and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Goudi, Athens, Greece.
  • 22Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy.
  • 23Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy.
  • 24Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy.
  • 25Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Human Genetics Foundation, Torino, Italy.
  • 26Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
  • 27Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
  • 28Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
  • 29Department of Clinical Sciences, Nutrition Epidemiology, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
  • 30Department of Clinical Sciences, Nutrition Epidemiology, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. Umeå University, Department of Perioperative and Surgical Sciences, Sweden.
  • 31Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology and Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
  • 32Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
  • 33Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Artic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
  • 34Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Artic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Genetic Epidemiology, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
  • 35Unit of Nutrition, Environment, and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. eduell@iconcologia.net.

Abstract

Acrylamide, classified in 1994 by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as "probably carcinogenic" to humans, was discovered in 2002 in some heat-treated, carbohydrate-rich foods. The association between dietary acrylamide intake and epithelial ovarian cancer risk (EOC) has been previously studied in one case-control and three prospective cohort studies which obtained inconsistent results and could not further examine histologic subtypes other than serous EOC. The present study was carried out in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) subcohort of women (n = 325,006). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between questionnaire-based acrylamide intake and EOC risk. Acrylamide was energy-adjusted using the residual method and was evaluated both as a continuous variable (per 10 μg/d) and in quintiles; when subgroups by histologic EOC subtypes were analyzed, acrylamide intake was evaluated in quartiles. During a mean follow-up of 11 years, 1,191 incident EOC cases were diagnosed. At baseline, the median acrylamide intake in EPIC was 21.3 μg/d. No associations and no evidence for a dose-response were observed between energy-adjusted acrylamide intake and EOC risk (HR10μg/d,1.02; 95% CI, 0.96-1.09; HRQ5vsQ1, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.76-1.23). No differences were seen when invasive EOC subtypes (582 serous, 118 endometrioid, and 79 mucinous tumors) were analyzed separately. This study did not provide evidence that acrylamide intake, based on food intake questionnaires, was associated with risk for EOC in EPIC. Additional studies with more reliable estimates of exposure based on biomarkers may be needed.

©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

PMID:
25300475
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4295892
Free PMC Article
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