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Epilepsy Behav. 2014 Aug;37:270-5. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2014.07.005. Epub 2014 Aug 12.

Effect of positive airway pressure therapy on seizure control in patients with epilepsy and obstructive sleep apnea.

Author information

  • 1Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute, Sleep Disorders and Epilepsy Centers, Cleveland, OH, USA; Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Neurology, Bangkok Hospital Pattaya, Bangkok Hospital Group, Thailand.
  • 2Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute, Sleep Disorders and Epilepsy Centers, Cleveland, OH, USA; Department of Neurology, Chosun University Hospital, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.
  • 3Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
  • 4Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute, Sleep Disorders and Epilepsy Centers, Cleveland, OH, USA.
  • 5Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute, Sleep Disorders and Epilepsy Centers, Cleveland, OH, USA. Electronic address: foldvan@ccf.org.

Abstract

Previous studies suggest that treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with epilepsy can improve seizure control. We investigated the effect of positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy on seizures in adults with epilepsy referred to the Cleveland Clinic for polysomnography (PSG) from 1997 to 2010. Seizure outcome at baseline and 1 year later was compared in patients with no OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] <5), patients with PAP-treated OSA, and patients with untreated OSA. One hundred thirty-two subjects (age: 40.2±13 (18-76) years, 65.4% female) were included. Seventy-six (57.6%) subjects had OSA; of these, 43 (56.6%) were on PAP therapy, and 33 (43.4%) were not on PAP therapy (either PAP-intolerant or refused therapy). Of the group with PAP-treated OSA, 83.7% were adherent (use ≥4 h/night at least 5 nights/week). The percentage of subjects with ≥50% seizure reduction and the mean percentage of seizure reduction were significantly greater in the group with PAP-treated OSA (73.9%; 58.5%) than in subjects with untreated OSA (14.3%; 17.0%). There were significantly more subjects with successful outcomes (with ≥50% seizure reduction or seizure-free at both baseline and follow-up) in the group with PAP-treated OSA (83.7%) than in the groups with no OSA (53.6%) and untreated OSA (39.4%). After adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, AHI, and epilepsy duration, we found that the odds of successful outcomes in subjects in the group with PAP-treated OSA were 9.9 and 3.91 times those of the groups with untreated OSA and no OSA, respectively. The group with PAP-treated OSA had 32.3 times the odds of having a ≥50% seizure reduction compared with the group with untreated OSA and 6.13 times compared with the group with no OSA. Positive airway pressure therapy appears to produce beneficial effects on seizures in adult patients with epilepsy and OSA.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Comorbidities; Epilepsy; Obstructive sleep apnea; Polysomnography; Positive airway pressure therapy; Seizure outcome

PMID:
25117208
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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