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Mol Genet Genomic Med. 2014 Jul;2(4):313-8. doi: 10.1002/mgg3.69. Epub 2014 Feb 24.

Association of the c.385C>A (p.Pro129Thr) polymorphism of the fatty acid amide hydrolase gene with anorexia nervosa in the Japanese population.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychosomatic Research, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine Ichikawa, Chiba, Japan.
  • 3Division of Psychosomatic Medicine, Department of Neurology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan ; Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Yahata Kosei Hospital Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan.
  • 4Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University Fukuoka, Fukuoka, Japan.
  • 5Takei Medical Clinic Kagoshima, Kagoshima, Japan.
  • 6Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Saitama Social Insurance Hospital Saitama, Saitama, Japan.
  • 7Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Kamibayashi Memorial Hospital Ichinomiya, Aichi, Japan.
  • 8Health Services Center, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 9Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Nogami Hospital Kagoshima, Kagoshima, Japan.
  • 10Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Family Hospital Satsuma Satsumasendai, Kagoshima, Japan.
  • 11Division of General Medicine, Aichi Medical University Hospital Nagakute, Aichi, Japan ; Setoguchi Psychosomatic Clinic Seto, Aichi, Japan.
  • 12Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine Osaka, Osaka, Japan ; Mental Health Clinic of Dr. Nagata at Nanba Osaka, Osaka, Japan.
  • 13Department of Internal Medicine, Yufuin Koseinenkin Hospital Yufuin, Oita, Japan.
  • 14Health Service Center, Hiroshima University Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan.
  • 15Graduate School of Welfare Society, The International University of Kagoshima Kagoshima, Kagoshima, Japan ; Nishihara Hoyouin Kaya, Kagoshima, Japan.
  • 16Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine Osaka, Osaka, Japan ; Hamadera Hospital Takaishi, Osaka, Japan.
  • 17Department of Nutrition, School of Home Economics and Science, Tokyo Kasei University Itabashi-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 18Department of Psychosomatic Research, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan ; School of Health Sciences at Fukuoka, International University of Health and Welfare Ohkawa, Japan.

Abstract

The functional c.385C>A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) gene, one of the major degrading enzymes of endocannabinoids, is reportedly associated with anorexia nervosa (AN). We genotyped the c.385C>A SNP (rs324420) in 762 lifetime AN and 605 control participants in Japan. There were significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies of c.385C>A between the AN and control groups. The minor 385A allele was less frequent in the AN participants than in the controls (allele-wise, odds ratio = 0.799, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.653-0.976, P = 0.028). When the cases were subdivided into lifetime restricting subtype AN and AN with a history of binge eating or purging, only the restricting AN group exhibited a significant association (allele-wise, odds ratio = 0.717, 95% CI 0.557-0.922, P = 0.0094). Our results suggest that having the minor 385A allele of the FAAH gene may be protective against AN, especially restricting AN. This finding supports the possible role of the endocannabinoid system in susceptibility to AN.

KEYWORDS:

Anandamide; cannabinoid 1 receptor; eating disorder; endocannabinoid

PMID:
25077173
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC4113271
Free PMC Article
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