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Stem Cells Dev. 2014 Nov 15;23(22):2791-802. doi: 10.1089/scd.2013.0496. Epub 2014 Jul 28.

Polysome profiling shows the identity of human adipose-derived stromal/stem cells in detail and clearly distinguishes them from dermal fibroblasts.

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  • 11 Instituto Carlos Chagas , Fiocruz-Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil .

Abstract

Although fibroblasts and multipotent stromal/stem cells, including adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs), have been extensively studied, they cannot be clearly distinguished from each other. We, therefore, investigated the cellular and molecular characteristics of ADSCs and fibroblasts. ADSCs and fibroblasts share several morphological similarities and surface markers, but were clearly found to be different types of cells. Contrary to previous reports, fibroblasts were not able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, or chondrocytes. Polysome-bound mRNA profiling revealed that ∼ 1,547 genes were differentially expressed (DE) in the two cell types; the genes were related to cell adhesion, the extracellular matrix, differentiation, and proliferation. These findings were confirmed by functional analyses showing that ADSCs had a greater adhesion capacity than fibroblasts; the proliferation rate of fibroblasts was also higher than that of ADSCs. Importantly, 185 DE genes were integral to the plasma membrane and, thus, candidate markers for ADSC isolation and manipulation. We also observed that an established marker of fibroblasts and ADSCs, CD105, was overexpressed in ADSCs at both mRNA and protein levels. CD105 expression seemed to be related to differentiation capacity, at least for adipogenesis. This study shows that ADSCs and fibroblasts are distinct cell types. These findings should be taken into account when using these two cell types in basic and therapeutic studies.

PMID:
25068904
[PubMed - in process]
PMCID:
PMC4216514
[Available on 2015-11-15]
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