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J Infect Chemother. 2014 Sep;20(9):527-34. doi: 10.1016/j.jiac.2014.06.012. Epub 2014 Jul 22.

Antibiotic susceptibility survey of blood-borne MRSA isolates in Japan from 2008 through 2011.

Author information

  • 1Research Center for Infections and Antimicrobials, Kitasato Institute for Life Science, Kitasato University, 5-9-1 Shirokane, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-864, Japan. Electronic address: hanaki@insti.kitasato-u.ac.jp.
  • 2Research Center for Infections and Antimicrobials, Kitasato Institute for Life Science, Kitasato University, 5-9-1 Shirokane, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-864, Japan.
  • 3Department of Infection Control, St Mary's Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.
  • 4Department of Laboratory Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan.
  • 5Department of Infection Control and Prevention, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan.
  • 6Department of Microbiology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 7Graduate School of Infection Control Sciences, Kitasato University, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 8Central Clinical Laboratory, Department of Infection Control and Laboratory Diagnostics, Internal Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Miyagi, Japan.
  • 9Department of Clinical Infectious Disease, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
  • 10Department of Laboratory Medicine, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 11Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, 3rd Dept. of Surg. Toho Univ. School of Med., Japan.
  • 12Department of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Aichi Medical University, Aichi, Japan.
  • 13Department of Infection Control, Fukuoka University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.
  • 14Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kameda Medical Center, Chiba, Japan.
  • 15Department of Laboratory Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka, Japan.
  • 16St. Marianna University, Kanagawa, Japan.
  • 17Department of International Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Japan.
  • 18Department of Clinical Research, National Hospital Organization, Tochigi Medical Center, Tochigi, Japan.
  • 19Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo 143-8540, Japan.
  • 20Internal Medicine 2, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, Idaigaoka 1-1, Hasama-machi, Yufu 879-5593, Japan.
  • 21Second Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan.
  • 22Department of Clinical Infectious Diseases, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

We conducted an antibiotic susceptibility survey of 830 blood-borne methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus collected from nationwide hospitals in Japan over a three-year period from January 2008 through May 2011. Antibiotic susceptibility was judged according to the criteria recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute. Over 99% of the MRSA showed to be susceptible to teicoplanin, linezolid, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and vancomycin, and over 97% of them were susceptible to daptomycin, arbekacin and rifampin. The majority of the MRSA strains showed resistant to minocycline, meropenem, imipenem, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, cefoxitin, and oxacillin in the rates of 56.6, 72.9, 73.7, 78.7, 89.0, 99.5, and 99.9%, respectively. Among the MRSA strains, 72 showed reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, including 8 strains (0.96%) of vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), 54 (6.51%) of heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA), and 55 (5.63%) of β-lactam antibiotics-induced vancomycin resistant S. aureus (BIVR). Unexpectedly, among the 54 hVISA and 55 BIVR, 45 isolates (83.3% and 81.8%, respectively) showed both hVISA and BIVR phenotypes. A new trend of vancomycin resistance found in this study was that VISA strains were still prevalent among the bacteremic specimens. The high rates of the hVISA/BIVR two-phenotypic vancomycin resistance, and the prevalence of VISA in the bloodborne MRSA call attention in the MRSA epidemiology in Japan.

Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotic susceptibility surveillance; Blood-borne MRSA; Heterogeneous VISA (hetero-VISA or hVISA); MRSA; Vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA); β-lactam antibiotics-induced vancomycin resistant S. aureus (BIVR)

PMID:
25066429
[PubMed - in process]
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