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Nat Genet. 2014 Sep;46(9):1034-8. doi: 10.1038/ng.3046. Epub 2014 Jul 27.

The genome of the stress-tolerant wild tomato species Solanum pennellii.

Author information

  • 11] Department of Metabolic Networks, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany. [2] Institute for Biology I, Institute for Botany and Molecular Genetics (IBMG), RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
  • 21] Department of Molecular Physiology, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany. [2] Consiglio per la Ricerca e la Sperimentazione in Agricoltura, Centro di Ricerca per l'Orticoltura, Pontecagnano, Italy.
  • 31] Department of Metabolic Networks, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany. [2] Institut für Bio- und Geowissenschaften 2 (IBG-2) Plant Sciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, Germany.
  • 4Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
  • 5French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA), UR1164 Research Unit in Genomics Info (URGI), INRA de Versailles-Grignon, Versailles, France.
  • 6Department of Molecular Physiology, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany.
  • 7Department of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.
  • 8Instituto de Biotecnología, Centro de Investigación en Ciencias Veterinarias y Agronómicas (CICVyA)-Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA) and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Castelar, Argentina.
  • 91] Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany. [2] Department of Plant Developmental Biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany.
  • 10Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel.
  • 11Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.
  • 121] Department of Molecular Physiology, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany. [2] Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterránea 'La Mayora', Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain.
  • 13Plant Research International, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
  • 141] Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany. [2] INRA, UMR 1318, Institut Jean-Pierre Bourgin, Versailles, France.
  • 15Department of Metabolic Networks, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany.
  • 16Department of Plant Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.
  • 171] Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany. [2] Department of Plant Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.
  • 181] Plant Research International, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, the Netherlands. [2].
  • 19Institute for Biology I, Institute for Botany and Molecular Genetics (IBMG), RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
  • 20Entwicklungs und Molekularbiologie der Pflanzen, Heinrich Heine Universität, Düsseldorf, Germany.
  • 21Institute for Biology I, Unit of Plant Molecular Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany.
  • 221] Department of Metabolic Networks, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany. [2] Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. [3] US Department of Agriculture Robert W. Holley Centre for Agriculture and Health, Ithaca, New York, USA.
  • 231] Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. [2] US Department of Agriculture Robert W. Holley Centre for Agriculture and Health, Ithaca, New York, USA.
  • 241] Department of Metabolic Networks, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany. [2] Institute for Biology I, Institute for Botany and Molecular Genetics (IBMG), RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany. [3] Institut für Bio- und Geowissenschaften 2 (IBG-2) Plant Sciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, Germany.

Abstract

Solanum pennellii is a wild tomato species endemic to Andean regions in South America, where it has evolved to thrive in arid habitats. Because of its extreme stress tolerance and unusual morphology, it is an important donor of germplasm for the cultivated tomato Solanum lycopersicum. Introgression lines (ILs) in which large genomic regions of S. lycopersicum are replaced with the corresponding segments from S. pennellii can show remarkably superior agronomic performance. Here we describe a high-quality genome assembly of the parents of the IL population. By anchoring the S. pennellii genome to the genetic map, we define candidate genes for stress tolerance and provide evidence that transposable elements had a role in the evolution of these traits. Our work paves a path toward further tomato improvement and for deciphering the mechanisms underlying the myriad other agronomic traits that can be improved with S. pennellii germplasm.

PMID:
25064008
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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