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Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl. 2014 Sep;42:412-20. doi: 10.1016/j.msec.2014.05.052. Epub 2014 Jun 2.

Inorganically modified diatomite as a potential prolonged-release drug carrier.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Cosmetology, University of Belgrade-Faculty of Pharmacy, Vojvode Stepe No. 450, 11221 Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: zoran.jan@ikom.rs.
  • 2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Cosmetology, University of Belgrade-Faculty of Pharmacy, Vojvode Stepe No. 450, 11221 Belgrade, Serbia.
  • 3Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Belgrade-Faculty of Pharmacy, Vojvode Stepe No. 450, 11221 Belgrade, Serbia.
  • 4Institute for the Technology of Nuclear and Other Mineral Raw Materials, Bulevar Franš d'Eperea No. 86, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia.
  • 5Institute for Chemistry, Technology & Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Department of Catalysis & Chemical Engineering, Njegoševa No. 12, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia.

Abstract

Inorganic modification of diatomite was performed with the precipitation product of partially neutralized aluminum sulfate solution at three different mass ratios. The starting and the modified diatomites were characterized by SEM-EDS, FTIR, thermal analysis and zeta potential measurements and evaluated for drug loading capacity in adsorption batch experiments using diclofenac sodium (DS) as a model drug. In vitro drug release studies were performed in phosphate buffer pH6.8 from comprimates containing: the drug adsorbed onto the selected modified diatomite sample (DAMD), physical mixture of the drug with the selected modified diatomite sample (PMDMD) and physical mixture of the drug with the starting diatomite (PMDD). In vivo acute toxicity testing of the modified diatomite samples was performed on mice. High adsorbent loading of the selected modified diatomite sample (~250mg/g in 2h) enabled the preparation of comprimates containing adsorbed DS in the amount near to its therapeutic dose. Drug release studies demonstrated prolonged release of DS over a period of 8h from both DAMD comprimates (18% after 8h) and PMDMD comprimates (45% after 8h). The release kinetics for DAMD and PMDMD comprimates fitted well with Korsmeyer-Peppas and Bhaskar models, indicating that the release mechanism was a combination of non-Fickian diffusion and ion exchange process.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Adsorption; Diatomite; Diclofenac sodium; Inorganic modification; Prolonged drug release

PMID:
25063135
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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