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Sleep. 2014 Jul 1;37(7):1237-47. doi: 10.5665/sleep.3846.

Examining the mechanism of action of a new device using oral pressure therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

Author information

  • 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Pulmonary Allergy and Critical Care Division and Center for Sleep & Circadian Neurobiology, Philadelphia PA.
  • 2Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA ; ApniCure, Redwood City CA.
  • 3Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.
  • 4Peninsula Sleep Center, Burlingame, CA.
  • 5ApniCure, Redwood City CA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this study was to explore the mechanism of action of the oral pressure therapy (OPT) device, a new treatment for sleep apnea.

DESIGN:

Case series.

SETTING:

Academic medical center.

PATIENTS:

Fifteen subjects with sleep apnea who had been successfully treated (responders) with the OPT device and 4 subjects who were not successfully treated (non-responders) with the OPT device.

INTERVENTIONS:

All subjects underwent a MRI (without the device, with the device in place without vacuum and with the device in place with vacuum) to examine the biomechanical changes associated with the OPT device.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Oral pressure therapy significantly (P = 0.002) increased the size of the retropalatal airway in both the lateral and anterior-posterior dimensions by moving the soft palate anteriorly and superiorly and the anterior-superior segment of the tongue forward, toward the teeth. The percentage and absolute increase in the cross-sectional area of the retropalatal region, the superior movement of the soft palate, and the anterior displacement of the tongue were significantly greater in the responders than in the non-responders. In responders, there were significant increases in the mean (P = 0.002), maximum (P = 0.0002), and minimum (P = 0.04) cross-sectional areas of the retropalatal region with the OPT device. However, in the retroglossal region, airway caliber decreased with the OPT device.

CONCLUSIONS:

In those who responded to oral pressure therapy, it increased airway caliber in the retropalatal region by moving the soft palate anteriorly and superiorly and the anterior-superior segment of the tongue forward.

CITATION:

Schwab RJ, Kim C, Siegel L, Keenan BT, Black J, Farid-Moayer M, Podmore J, Vaska M. Examining the mechanism of action of a new device using oral pressure therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

KEYWORDS:

MRI; oral pressure therapy; sleep apnea; upper airway imaging

PMID:
25061252
[PubMed - in process]
PMCID:
PMC4098809
[Available on 2015/1/1]
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