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Vet Parasitol. 2014 Sep 15;205(1-2):199-207. doi: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2014.06.022. Epub 2014 Jun 26.

Effects of supplementation with dietary green tea polyphenols on parasite resistance and acute phase protein response to Haemonchus contortus infection in lambs.

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  • 1Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102, Jilin, PR China; College of Animal Science and Technology, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun 130118, Jilin, PR China.
  • 2College of Animal Science and Technology, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun 130118, Jilin, PR China.
  • 3Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102, Jilin, PR China.
  • 4Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102, Jilin, PR China. Electronic address: zhoudaowei@neigae.ac.cn.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the effects of supplementation with dietary green tea polyphenols (GTPs) on parasite resistance and acute phase protein (APP) response to Haemonchus contortus infection in lambs. Thirty male Ujumqin lambs were randomly assigned to five treatment groups for an 8-week feeding period. Treatments included: (1) uninfected as control, (2) infected but not given GTP (INFGTP0) and (3)-(5) infected and fed 2, 4, or 6g GTP/kg feed (dry matter basis; INFGTP2, INFGTP4, and INFGTP6, respectively). Fecal and blood samples were collected to determine fecal egg count (FEC), packed cell volume (PCV), and APP concentrations. Live weight was measured once every 2 weeks. At the end of the feeding period, lambs were slaughtered to determine the adult H. contortus burden. The results demonstrated interaction effects between treatment and sampling time on the average daily gain (ADG; P=0.0005), FEC (P<0.0001), PCV (P=0.0005), and concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), and α1-acid glycoprotein (α1AGP) (P<0.0001). From days 0 to 56, the ADG values for all infected lambs were lower than that of uninfected lambs, but the ADG values for all GTP-fed lambs were higher than that of INFGTP0 lambs, especially from days 28 to 42. The FECs of all GTP-fed lambs were higher than those of uninfected lambs but lower than that of INFGTP0 lambs. The PCVs of all infected lambs were lower than those of uninfected lambs, but PCV increased with increasing amounts of GTP supplementation. Furthermore, supplementation with different concentrations of GTP significantly reduced the numbers of adult H. contortus, including both males and females (P<0.0001), and the H. contortus burden in INFGTP6 lambs was reduced to uninfected levels. Overall, the SAA, Hp, LBP, and α1AGP concentrations of all infected lambs were higher than those of uninfected lambs from days 0 to 56. Two peaks in expression were observed from days 0 to 3 and at day 28, and APP concentrations of all GTP-fed lambs were lower than those of INFGTP0 lambs, except for SAA in INFGTP6 lambs. In conclusion, quantitative measurements of APP responses to H. contortus infection provide valuable diagnostic information for monitoring infection progression and treatment responses in lambs. An appropriate dose of dietary GTP supplementation can increase host resistance by reducing H. contortus burden and weight loss and suppressing blood APP expression.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Acute phase proteins; Haemonchus contortus; Lambs; Resistance; Tea polyphenols

PMID:
25042046
[PubMed - in process]
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