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Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Sep;37(4):211-20. doi: 10.1016/j.cimid.2014.05.004. Epub 2014 Jul 3.

A rabbit model of non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia.

Author information

  • 1Program of Comparative Medicine and Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States. Electronic address: apanda@vetmed.umaryland.edu.
  • 2Program of Comparative Medicine and Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States.
  • 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States.
  • 4Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States.
  • 5Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, United States.
  • 6Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States; Department of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States; Center for Vaccine Development, Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Pediatrics, Departments of Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States.
  • 7Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States; Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States.
  • 8Program of Comparative Medicine and Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States; Department of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States.

Abstract

Bacteremia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. In this study, we focused on the development of an animal model of bacteremia induced by non-typhoidal Salmonella. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated with a human isolate of non-typhoidal Salmonella strain CVD J73 via the intra-peritoneal route. Blood samples were collected at specific time points and at euthanasia from infected rabbits. Additionally, tissue samples from the heart, lungs, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, liver and kidneys were obtained at euthanasia. All experimentally infected rabbits displayed clinical signs of disease (fever, dehydration, weight loss and lethargy). Tissues collected at necropsy from the animals exhibited histopathological changes indicative of bacteremia. Non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteria were detected in the blood and tissue samples of infected rabbits by microbiological culture and real-time PCR assays. The development of this animal model of bacteremia could prove to be a useful tool for studying how non-typhoidal Salmonella infections disseminate and spread in humans.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Bacteremia; Non-typhoidal Salmonella infections; Rabbit model

PMID:
25033732
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4167468
[Available on 2015-09-01]
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