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Endocrinology. 1989 Aug;125(2):810-6.

Endocrine and pharmacological suppressors of bone turnover protect against osteopenia in ovariectomized rats.

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  • 1Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, Gainesville 32610.

Abstract

This study was designed to test the hypothesis that endocrine and pharmacological suppressors of bone turnover prevent the development of osteopenia during estrogen deficiency. Sham-operated control and ovariectomized (OVX) rats were treated intermittently with vehicle alone, estrogen, or the diphosphonate compounds etidronate disodium (EHDP) and NE-58095 [2-(3-pyridinyl)2-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-bisphosphonate disodium] for 35 or 70 days after surgery. Their proximal tibiae were processed undecalcified for quantitative bone histomorphometry. Vehicle-treated OVX rats were characterized by decreased cancellous bone volume and 3- to 4-fold increases in osteoblast surface, osteoclast surface, bone formation rate, and bone resorption rate. Treatment of OVX rats with estrogen and NE-58095 provided complete protection against bone loss and significantly depressed all of the above indices of bone turnover. OVX rats treated with EHDP exhibited at least partial protection against bone loss and decreased bone turnover. EHDP induced a mild mineralization defect, as indicated by a prolonged mineralization lag time at the tibial endocortical surface. The new diphosphonate compound NE-58095 did not impair bone mineralization. Our results indicate that endocrine and pharmacological suppressors of bone turnover prevent the development of osteopenia during the early stages of estrogen deficiency. If confirmed by clinical trials in humans, diphosphonate compounds may prove to be an alternative to estrogen for the prevention of postmenopausal bone loss.

PMID:
2502377
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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