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Occup Environ Med. 2014 Jun;71 Suppl 1:A71. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2014-102362.221.

0084 A Case-Control Study of Occupational Exposure to Metalworking Fluids and Bladder Cancer Risk among Men.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, USA.
  • 2Stewart Exposure Assessments, LLC, Arlington, VA, USA.
  • 3Korea National Open University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
  • 4Vermont Cancer Registry, Burlington, VT, USA.
  • 5Maine Cancer Registry, Augusta, ME, USA.
  • 6Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA.
  • 7New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Concord, NH, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Metalworking has been associated with bladder cancer risk in many studies. Metalworking fluids (MWFs) are suspected as the putative exposure, but epidemiologic data are limited. Based on state-of-the-art, quantitative exposure assessment, we examined MWF exposure and bladder cancer risk in the New England Bladder Cancer Study.

METHOD:

Male cases (n = 895) and population controls (n = 1031) provided occupational histories and information on use of each of three MWF types: (1) straight (mineral oil, additives), (2) soluble (mineral oil, water, additives), and (3) synthetic (water, organics, additives) or semi-synthetic (soluble/synthetic hybrid), in response to exposure-oriented modules administered during personal interviews. We estimated the probability, frequency, and intensity of exposure to each MWF type and, if probability exceeded 50%, cumulative exposure. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for smoking and other risk factors.

RESULTS:

Risk was increased for men reporting use of straight MWFs (OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.1-2.8), with a significant trend with increasing cumulative exposure (p = 0.024). Use of soluble MWFs conferred a 50% elevated risk (95% CI=0.96-2.5). ORs were nonsignificantly elevated for synthetic MWFs, based on small numbers. Men who were never metalworkers, but held jobs with possible exposure to mineral oil, had a 40% increased risk (95% CI=1.1-1.8).

CONCLUSIONS:

In the most comprehensive assessment of MWF exposure in a bladder cancer case-control study, exposure to straight MWFs significantly increased bladder cancer risk, as did employment in non-metalworking jobs with possible mineral oil exposure. Our results strengthen prior evidence for mineral oil as a bladder carcinogen.

© 2014, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

PMID:
25018457
[PubMed - in process]
PMCID:
PMC4116153
Free PMC Article
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