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Cancer Biol Ther. 2014 Oct;15(10):1312-9. doi: 10.4161/cbt.29685. Epub 2014 Jul 10.

Arsenite promotes intestinal tumor cell proliferation and invasion by stimulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pathophysiology; School of Basic Medical Sciences; Anhui Medical University; Hefei, Anhui, PR China.
  • 2Department of Pathophysiology; School of Basic Medical Sciences; Anhui Medical University; Hefei, Anhui, PR China; Department of Ultrasound; Zhongda Hospital; Southeast University; Nanjing, Jiangsu, PR China.
  • 3Department of Pathophysiology; School of Basic Medical Sciences; Anhui Medical University; Hefei, Anhui, PR China; Department of Clinical Medicine; Anhui Medical University; Hefei, Anhui, PR China.

Abstract

Arsenite (AS) is a ubiquitous environmental element that is widely present in food, soil, and water. Environmental exposure to AS represents a major global health concern, because AS is a well-established human carcinogen. We hypothesize that low concentration of AS could enhance metastasis and proliferation of transformed cancer cells by promoting EMT. To test this hypothesis, we treated human colorectal cancer cells with low concentration of AS, and then measured the multiple readouts of cell viability, proliferation, migration, and adhesion in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our data indeed strongly support our hypothesis and shed novel light into this important pathophysiological process. These novel insights are not only of high interests to basic cancer research, but may also have direct implications in cancer prevention and treatment.

KEYWORDS:

As2O3); arsenite (AS; colon cancer; epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT); tumor invasion and proliferation

PMID:
25010681
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4130724
Free PMC Article
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