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Clin Cancer Res. 2014 Sep 1;20(17):4598-612. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-3380. Epub 2014 Jul 9.

Large-scale characterization of DNA methylation changes in human gastric carcinomas with and without metastasis.

Author information

  • 1Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Division of Etiology, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Fu-Cheng-Lu, Beijing, China.
  • 2Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Division of Etiology, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Fu-Cheng-Lu, Beijing, China. Shihezi University School of Medicine, Shihezi, China.
  • 3GRU Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia.
  • 4Department of Surgery, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Fu-Cheng-Lu, Beijing, China.
  • 5Department of Oncology, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Fu-Cheng-Lu, Beijing, China.
  • 6Division of Epigenetics, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 7Department of Molecular Oncology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 8Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea.
  • 9GRU Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia. dengdajun@bjmu.edu.cn hshi@gru.edu.
  • 10Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Division of Etiology, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Fu-Cheng-Lu, Beijing, China. dengdajun@bjmu.edu.cn hshi@gru.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Metastasis is the leading cause of death for gastric carcinoma. An epigenetic biomarker panel for predicting gastric carcinoma metastasis could have significant clinical impact on the care of patients with gastric carcinoma. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the methylation differences between gastric carcinomas with and without metastasis.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

Genome-wide DNA methylation profiles between 4 metastatic and 4 nonmetastatic gastric carcinomas and their surgical margins (SM) were analyzed using methylated-CpG island amplification with microarray. The methylation states of 73 candidate genes were further analyzed in patients with gastric carcinoma in a discovery cohort (n=108) using denatured high performance liquid chromatography, bisulfite-sequencing, and MethyLight. The predictive values of potential metastasis-methylation biomarkers were validated in cohorts of patients with gastric carcinoma in China (n=330), Japan (n=129), and Korea (n=153).

RESULTS:

The gastric carcinoma genome showed significantly higher proportions of hypomethylation in the promoter and exon-1 regions, as well as increased hypermethylation of intragenic fragments when compared with SMs. Significant differential methylation was validated in the CpG islands of 15 genes (P<0.05) and confirmed using bisulfite sequencing. These genes included BMP3, BNIP3, CDKN2A, ECEL1, ELK1, GFRA1, HOXD10, KCNH1, PSMD10, PTPRT, SIGIRR, SRF, TBX5, TFPI2, and ZNF382. Methylation changes of GFRA1, SRF, and ZNF382 resulted in up- or downregulation of their transcription. Most importantly, the prevalence of GFRA1, SRF, and ZNF382 methylation alterations was consistently and coordinately associated with gastric carcinoma metastasis and the patients' overall survival throughout discovery and validation cohorts in China, Japan, and Korea.

CONCLUSION:

Methylation changes of GFRA1, SRF, and ZNF382 may be a potential biomarker set for prediction of gastric carcinoma metastasis.

©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

PMID:
25009298
[PubMed - in process]
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