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Sci Total Environ. 2014 Sep 15;493:806-11. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.06.067. Epub 2014 Jul 4.

Predictors of urinary trichloroacetic acid and baseline blood trihalomethanes concentrations among men in China.

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  • 1Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, PR China; Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Environmental Protection, and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (incubating), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, PR China.
  • 2College of Public Health University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan, PR China.
  • 3Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, PR China; Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Environmental Protection, and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (incubating), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, PR China. Electronic address: luwq@mails.tjmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) and baseline blood trihalomethanes (THMs) have been measured as biomarkers of exposure to drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have been associated with increased risk of cancers and adverse reproductive outcomes. This study aimed to identify predictors of urinary TCAA and baseline blood THMs among men in China. Urine samples, blood samples, and information on socio-demographic factors and water-use activities were collected from 2216 men who participated in a cross-sectional study of exposure to drinking water DBPs and reproductive health during 2011 to 2012. Urinary TCAA and baseline blood THMs including chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM) were analyzed. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate predictors of urinary TCAA and baseline blood THM concentrations. Tap water consumption was significantly associated with creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentration (β = 0.23 μg/g creatinine per log10 unit; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.35). Men with surface water source had 0.13 (95% CI: 0.00, 0.27) higher mean creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations than those with ground water source. Smoking was associated with lower concentration of creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA. Age was significantly associated with baseline blood Br-THM (sum of BDCM, DBCM, and TBM) concentration (β = 0.01 ng/L per unit; 95% CI: 0.00, 0.02). Increased household income was associated with decreased concentrations of baseline blood BDCM and Br-THMs. Our results suggest that tap water consumption, water source, smoking, age, and household income as the primary determinants of exposure to drinking water DBPs should be considered in exposure assessment.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarker; Disinfection by-products; Drinking water; Trichloroacetic acid; Trihalomethanes

PMID:
25000576
[PubMed - in process]
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