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Biomaterials. 2014 Sep;35(29):8416-26. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2014.06.006. Epub 2014 Jul 3.

MLV based viral-like-particles for delivery of toxic proteins and nuclear transcription factors.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, 675 Hoes Lane Rm 636, Piscataway, NJ, USA.
  • 2Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, 675 Hoes Lane Rm 636, Piscataway, NJ, USA. Electronic address: roth@rwjms.rutgers.edu.

Abstract

We have developed nanoparticles based on Murine Leukemia Virus virus-like-particles (VLPs) that efficiently deliver therapeutic bioactive proteins in their native state into target cells. Nuclear transcription factors and toxic proteins were incorporated into the VLPs from stable producer cells without transducing viral-encoded genetic material. Delivery of nuclear transcription factors required incorporation of nuclear export signals (NESs) into the vector backbone for the efficient formation of VLPs. In the presence of an appropriate targeting Env glycoprotein, transcription factors delivered and activated nuclear transcription in the target cells. Additionally, we show delivery of the bacterial toxin, MazF, which is an ACA-specific mRNA interferase resulted in the induction of cell death. The stable producer cells are protected from the toxin through co-expression of the anti-toxin MazE and continuously released MazF incorporating VLPs. This highly adaptable platform can be harnessed to alter and regulate cellular processes by bioactive protein delivery.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Bacterial toxin; Intracellular delivery; Protein transduction; Transcriptional factors; Viral-like particles

PMID:
24997480
[PubMed - in process]
PMCID:
PMC4139071
[Available on 2015/9/1]
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