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Biomaterials. 2014 Sep;35(29):8427-38. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2014.06.021. Epub 2014 Jun 28.

Branched-linear and agglomerate protein polymers as vaccine platforms.

Author information

  • 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, USA.
  • 2Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA.
  • 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
  • 4Division of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Electronic address: Ming.Tan@cchmc.org.

Abstract

Many viral structural proteins and their truncated domains share a common feature of homotypic interaction forming dimers, trimers, and/or oligomers with various valences. We reported previously a simple strategy for construction of linear and network polymers through the dimerization feature of viral proteins for vaccine development. In this study, technologies were developed to produce more sophisticated polyvalent complexes through both the dimerization and oligomerization natures of viral antigens. As proof of concept, branched-linear and agglomerate polymers were made via fusions of the dimeric glutathione-s-transferase (GST) with either a tetrameric hepatitis E virus (HEV) protruding protein or a 24-meric norovirus (NoV) protruding protein. Furthermore, a monomeric antigen, either the M2e epitope of influenza A virus or the VP8* antigen of rotavirus, was inserted and displayed by the polymer platform. All resulting polymers were easily produced in Escherichia coli at high yields. Immunization of mice showed that the polymer vaccines induced significantly higher specific humoral and T cell responses than those induced by the dimeric antigens. Additional evidence in supporting use of polymer vaccines included the significantly higher neutralization activity and protective immunity of the polymer vaccines against the corresponding viruses than those of the dimer vaccines. Thus, our technology for production of polymers containing different viral antigens offers a strategy for vaccine development against infectious pathogens and their associated diseases.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Flu vaccine; Hepatitis E virus vaccine; Norovirus; Norovirus vaccine; Vaccine development; Vaccine platform

PMID:
24985736
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4137571
[Available on 2015-09-01]
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