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Nat Chem Biol. 2014 Aug;10(8):640-7. doi: 10.1038/nchembio.1564. Epub 2014 Jun 29.

Biosynthesis of polybrominated aromatic organic compounds by marine bacteria.

Author information

  • 11] Center for Oceans and Human Health, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. [2].
  • 21] Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. [2].
  • 3Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.
  • 41] Center for Oceans and Human Health, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. [2] Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. [3] Division of Biological Sciences, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.
  • 51] Center for Oceans and Human Health, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. [2] Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA. [3] Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.

Abstract

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated bipyrroles are natural products that bioaccumulate in the marine food chain. PBDEs have attracted widespread attention because of their persistence in the environment and potential toxicity to humans. However, the natural origins of PBDE biosynthesis are not known. Here we report marine bacteria as producers of PBDEs and establish a genetic and molecular foundation for their production that unifies paradigms for the elaboration of bromophenols and bromopyrroles abundant in marine biota. We provide biochemical evidence of marine brominases revealing decarboxylative-halogenation enzymology previously unknown among halogenating enzymes. Biosynthetic motifs discovered in our study were used to mine sequence databases to discover unrealized marine bacterial producers of organobromine compounds.

PMID:
24974229
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4104138
[Available on 2015/2/1]
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