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Cancer Control. 2014 Jul;21(3):247-50.

Histopathological and immunophenotypical features of intestinal-type adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder and its precursors.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intestinal-type adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder is an unusual malignancy associated with low- and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasms. The literature on the clinicopathologic characteristics of the precursor lesions of gallbladder cancer is limited, due in part to the variability in its definition and terminology.

METHODS:

Here we report one case of intestinal-type adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with distinctive morphology and associated precursor lesions. All of the hematoxylin and eosin stained slides were reviewed. Immunostains were performed using the avidin-biotin complex method for CK20, CK7, CDX2, MUC1, MUC2, and MUC-5AC. We also reviewed the literature discussing the current terminology from the World Health Organization for these lesions.

RESULTS:

A 70-year-old man presented with epigastric abdominal pain and bloating. Computed tomography demonstrated a large heterogeneous gallbladder mass. Macroscopically, the gallbladder was 7.5 x 5.5 x 4.5 cm with smooth serosa. The lumen was occupied by a 5.0 x 4.5 x 3.0 cm irregular friable exophytic mass. The remaining mucosa had a tan brown to pink color with granular/papillary excrescences of up to 0.7 cm in thickness. Histologically, the tubulopapillary adenoma was lined by pseudostratified columnar epithelium with low and extensive high-grade dysplasia. Goblet cell and cystic dilatation were present in some glands. Immunohistochemistry showed that the intestinal type was positive for CK20, CK7, and CDX2, focally positive for MUC1/2, and negative for MUC-5AC.

CONCLUSION:

This case showed the complete spectrum of the progression of intestinal-type intracholecystic papillary-tubular neoplasms of the gallbladder.

PMID:
24955710
[PubMed - in process]
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