Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Osong Public Health Res Perspect. 2014 Feb;5(1):9-19. doi: 10.1016/j.phrp.2013.12.001. Epub 2014 Jan 10.

Community-Based Risk Communication Survey: Risk Prevention Behaviors in Communities during the H1N1 crisis, 2010.

Author information

  • 1Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
  • 2Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Gwangju, Korea.
  • 3Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu, Korea.
  • 4Department of Preventive Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Korea.
  • 5Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Korea.
  • 6Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
  • 7Graduate School of Public Health, Ajou University, Suwon, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of and factors associated with H1N1 preventive behaviors in a community-based population.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was conducted in three urban and two rural communities in Korea. Interviews were conducted with 3462 individuals (1608 men and 1854 women) aged ≥ 19 years during February-March 2010. Influenza-related information including anxiety, preventive behaviors and their perceived effectiveness, vaccination status, past influenza-like illness symptoms, and sources of and trust in information was obtained.

RESULTS:

Among 3462 participants, 173 reported experiencing influenza-like illness symptoms within the past 12 months. The mean H1N1 preventive behavior score was 25.5 ± 5.5 (out of a possible 40). The percent of participants reporting high perceived effectiveness and high anxiety was 46.2% and 21.4%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, H1N1 preventive behavior scores were predicted by a high (β = 3.577, p < 0.001) or moderate (β = 2.529, p < 0.001) perception of their effectiveness. Similarly, moderate (β = 1.516, p < 0.001) and high (β = 4.103, p < 0.001) anxiety scores predicted high preventive behavior scores.

CONCLUSION:

Effective methods of promoting population behavior change may be nationwide campaigns through mass media, as well as education and promotion by health care providers and broadcasters.

KEYWORDS:

H1N1 virus; anxiety; behavior; cross-sectional survey; self-efficacy

PMID:
24955307
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC4064644
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk