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Alcohol. 2014 Aug;48(5):427-31. doi: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2014.01.013. Epub 2014 May 21.

Effects of the novel cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist PF 514273 on the acquisition and expression of ethanol conditioned place preference.

Author information

  • 1Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239-3098, USA. Electronic address: pina@ohsu.edu.
  • 2Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239-3098, USA.

Abstract

The centrally expressed cannabinoid receptor (CB1) has been considered a potential therapeutic target in treating alcoholism. Though CB1 receptors have been shown to modulate primary and conditioned ethanol reward, much of this research employed animal models that require ethanol ingestion or oral routes of administration. This is problematic considering CB1 antagonist drugs have high anorectic liability and have been used clinically in the treatment of obesity. Therefore, the present study examined CB1 antagonism in DBA/2J mice using an unbiased ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, a paradigm that does not require ethanol ingestion. To evaluate the role of CB1 receptors in primary ethanol reward, the highly potent and selective novel CB1 antagonist 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(2,2-difluoropropyl)-6,7-dihydro-2H-pyrazolo[3,4-f][1,4]oxazepin-8(5H)-one (PF 514273) was administered 30 min before place preference conditioning with a fixed dose of ethanol (acquisition). To evaluate the role of CB1 receptors in ethanol-conditioned reward, PF 514273 was administered 30 min before place preference testing (expression). Although PF 514273 reduced ethanol-stimulated and basal locomotor activity, it did not perturb the acquisition or expression of ethanol-induced CPP. Results from the present study appear inconsistent with other studies that have demonstrated a role for CB1 antagonism in ethanol reward using oral administration paradigms. Our findings suggest that CB1 antagonism may have greater involvement in consummatory behavior than ethanol reward.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

CB1; DBA/2J; Ethanol; Inbred mice; Locomotor activity; PF 514273; Place preference; Reward; Rimonabant; SR141716A

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