Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Biomater Appl. 2014 Oct;29(4):624-35. doi: 10.1177/0885328214539822. Epub 2014 Jun 17.

Surface modification of porous polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds for bone regeneration in rat calvaria defect.

Author information

  • 1Department of Regenerative Medicine, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan, South Korea.
  • 2Department of Regenerative Medicine, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan, South Korea Institute of Tissue Regeneration, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan, South Korea.
  • 3Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan, South Korea.
  • 4Department of Regenerative Medicine, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan, South Korea Institute of Tissue Regeneration, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan, South Korea lbt@sch.ac.kr.

Abstract

In this study, polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated by a salt-leaching process were loaded with biphasic calcium phosphate successfully to improve the osteoconductivity in bone regeneration. The surface of polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds was aminolyzed by 1,6-hexamethylenediamine to introduce amino groups onto the surface, which was verified qualitatively by ninhyrin staining. Collagen was further immobilized on the aminolyzed porous polycaprolactone via N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropy) carbodiimide hydrochloride/hydroxy-2,5-dioxopyrolidine-3-sulfonic acid sodium cross-linking. The pore size of polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate-collagen scaffolds was 200-300 µm, which was suitable for bone in-growth. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the coupling of collagen immobilized on the surface of polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate. In vitro results demonstrated that the spreading and viability of MC3T3-E1 cells were remarkably improved in the polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate-collagen scaffolds. The in vivo study was carried out by implanting the porous polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate, and polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate-collagen to the skulls of rats. Although the addition of biphasic calcium phosphate particles in the polycaprolactone scaffolds does not have a strong effect on the new bone formation, the immobilization of collagen on the polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds significantly improved the bone regeneration even though the implantation time was short, 6 weeks. The present results provide more evidence that functionalizing polycaprolactone with biphasic calcium phosphate and collagen may be a feasible way to improve the osteoconduction in bone regeneration.

© The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

KEYWORDS:

Porous PCL/BCP; aminolysis; bone regeneration; collagen immobilization; surface modification

PMID:
24939961
[PubMed - in process]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk