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Ann Epidemiol. 2014 Jul;24(7):493-7. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2014.01.014. Epub 2014 Apr 28.

Changes in the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders among male and female current smokers in the United States: 1990-2001.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Queens College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY); Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY. Electronic address: rdg66@columbia.edu.
  • 2Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY; New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY.
  • 3New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY.
  • 4Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY.
  • 5Department of Psychology, Queens College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY).
  • 6Department of Psychology, Queens College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY); Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY.
  • 7Department of Psychology, University of Houston, Houston, TX; Department of Psychiatry, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.
  • 8Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY; Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY; New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The present study investigated whether the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders has increased over time among current smokers and whether these trends differ by gender and in comparison with nonsmokers.

METHODS:

Data were drawn from the National Comorbidity Survey (1990) and the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication (2001), representative samples of the US adult population. Binomial regression analyses were used to determine differences between mood and anxiety disorders among current smokers in 1990 and 2001 and whether these differed by gender and in comparison with those who were former or never current smokers.

RESULTS:

Any anxiety disorder, panic attacks, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and dysthymia were all significantly more common among current smokers in 2001 compared with 1990 and except for social anxiety disorder these increases were significantly greater than any trend found in non-smokers. Increases in panic attacks, social anxiety disorder, and dysthymia were more pronounced in female than in male smokers. Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were not found to increase over time among smokers.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prevalence of several anxiety disorders and dysthymia among current smokers appears to have increased from 1990 to 2001. Future studies are needed to determine whether these trends have continued. If so, interventions aimed at moving the prevalence lower may have limited success if treatment of mental health problems such as anxiety disorders and certain mood disorders are not considered in the development and dissemination of tobacco control programs.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Depression; Prevalence; Tobacco

PMID:
24935462
[PubMed - in process]
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