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Psychiatry Res. 2014 Oct 30;219(2):241-7. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2014.05.023. Epub 2014 May 22.

Assessing blinding in trials of psychiatric disorders: a meta-analysis based on blinding index.

Author information

  • 1The Center for Musculoskeletal Care and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. Electronic address: Brian.Freed@nyumc.org.
  • 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne Medical School, Cologne, Germany.
  • 3The Center for Musculoskeletal Care and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
  • 4Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
  • 5Asian Medicine and Acupuncture Research, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7200, USA; Center for Pain Research and Innovation, UNC School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7455, USA.

Abstract

The assessment of blinding in RCTs is rarely performed. Currently most studies that do report data on evaluation of blinding merely report percentages of correct guessing, not taking into account correct guessing by chance. Blinding assessment using the blinding index (BI) has never been performed in a systematic review on studies of major psychiatric disorders. This study is a systematic review of psychiatric randomized control trials using the BI as a chance-corrected measurement of blinding, a tool to analyze and understand the patterns of blinding across studies of major psychiatric disorders with available data. Of 2467 psychiatric RCTs from 2000 to 2010, 66 reported on blinding and 40 studies were found to have enough information on evaluation of blinding to be analyzed using the BI. The experimental treatment groups had an average BI value of 0.14 and the control groups had an average BI value of 0.00. The most common BI scenario was random-random, indicating ideal blinding. A positive correlation between effect size and more correct guesses was also found. Overall, based on BI values and the most common blinding scenario, the published articles on major psychiatric disorders from 2000 to 2010, which reported on blinding assessment for patients, were effectively blinded.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Affective disorders; Blinded trials; Double-blind trials; Methodology; RCT; Schizophrenia; Therapy

PMID:
24930582
[PubMed - in process]
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