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Behav Brain Res. 2014 Sep 1;271:79-88. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2014.06.001. Epub 2014 Jun 9.

Partial rescue of memory deficits induced by calorie restriction in a mouse model of tau deposition.

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  • 1University of South Florida College of Medicine, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, Tampa, FL, United States of America; USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute, Tampa, FL, United States of America.
  • 2USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute, Tampa, FL, United States of America.
  • 3USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute, Tampa, FL, United States of America; University of South Florida College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tampa, FL, United States of America.
  • 4USF Health College of Behavioral & Community Sciences, Tampa, FL, United States of America.
  • 5Division of Comparative Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United States of America.
  • 6University of South Florida College of Medicine, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, Tampa, FL, United States of America; USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute, Tampa, FL, United States of America. Electronic address: scientist.dave@gmail.com.

Abstract

Calorie restriction (CR) was shown previously to improve cognition and decrease pathology in transgenic mouse models with Alzheimer-like amyloid deposition. In the present study, we investigated the effects of CR on the Tg4510 model of tau deposition. Mice in the calorie restriction group had food intake gradually decreased until they reached an average of 35% body weight reduction. Body weight and food intake were monitored throughout the study. After being on their respective diets for 3 months, all animals were submitted to behavioral testing. Tg4510 mice fed ad libitum showed lower body weight than nontransgenic littermates despite their increased food intake. Additionally, Tg4510 showed increased locomotor activity in the open field regardless of diet. Calorie restricted Tg4510 mice performed significantly better than ad libitum fed mice in the novel object recognition test, suggesting improved short-term memory. CR Tg4510 mice also performed significantly better in contextual fear conditioning than mice fed ad libitum. However, in a modified version of the novelty test that allows for interaction with other mice instead of inanimate objects, CR was not able to rescue the deficit found in Tg4510 mice in this ethologically more salient version of the task. No treatment differences in motor performance or spatial memory were observed in the rotarod or radial arm water maze tests, respectively. Histopathological and biochemical assessments showed no diet-induced changes in total or phospho-tau levels. Moreover, increased activation of both astrocytes and microglia in Tg4510 mice was not rescued by calorie restriction. Taken together, our data suggests that, despite an apparent rescue of associative memory, CR had no consistent effects on pathological outcomes of a mouse model of tau deposition.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Body weight; Dietary restriction; Food intake; Novel object recognition; Tauopathy

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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