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Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2014 Jun 6. [Epub ahead of print]

The significance of F139V mutation on thrombotic events in compound heterozygous and homozygous protein C deficiency.

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  • 1aClinical Laboratory Diagnostic Centre bDepartment of haematology cDepartment of Surgery, Wenzhou Key Laboratory of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, China.

Abstract

Both compound heterozygous and homozygous protein C deficiencies (PCDs) can cause lethal thrombotic events in children. This study investigated the significance of F139V mutation in activation of protein C in heterozygous and biallelic PCD. Two pedigrees with three probands were recruited, including heterozygous, compound heterozygous, and homozygous PCD and non-PCD families. The plasma levels of protein C activity (PC:A), protein C antigen (PC:Ag), factor V:C, factor VIII:C, fibrinogen (FIB), and D-dimer (D-D) were measured. Prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and thrombin time (TT) were also detected. All nine exons of protein C gene (PROC) were sequenced. Protein C mutation, T>G at site 6128 (exon 7) resulting in F139V, was identified in both pedigrees. Heterozygous missense mutation F139V (n = 10) had 56.4% lower levels of PC:A and PC:Ag compared with members with wild-type PROC (n = 6). Biallelic compound heterozygous and homozygous PCDs with F139V (n = 3) significantly decreased the levels of PC:A and PC:Ag compared with heterozygous members (P < 0.05); however, these were not lethal. Heterozygous F139V mutations of PRO caused mild reduction of protein C function, which might be the reason for survival of compound heterozygous or homozygous PCD with F139V in adults.

PMID:
24911457
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