Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2014 Jun 9;9(6):e99250. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099250. eCollection 2014.

Neural correlates associated with successful working memory performance in older adults as revealed by spatial ICA.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; BCN-NeuroImaging Center, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
  • 2Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; BCN-NeuroImaging Center, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Abstract

To investigate which neural correlates are associated with successful working memory performance, fMRI was recorded in healthy younger and older adults during performance on an n-back task with varying task demands. To identify functional networks supporting working memory processes, we used independent component analysis (ICA) decomposition of the fMRI data. Compared to younger adults, older adults showed a larger neural (BOLD) response in the more complex (2-back) than in the baseline (0-back) task condition, in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) and in the right fronto-parietal network (FPN). Our results indicated that a higher BOLD response in the VLPFC was associated with increased performance accuracy in older adults, in both the baseline and the more complex task condition. This 'BOLD-performance' relationship suggests that the neural correlates linked with successful performance in the older adults are not uniquely related to specific working memory processes present in the complex but not in the baseline task condition. Furthermore, the selective presence of this relationship in older but not in younger adults suggests that increased neural activity in the VLPFC serves a compensatory role in the aging brain which benefits task performance in the elderly.

PMID:
24911016
[PubMed - in process]
PMCID:
PMC4049600
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk