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Epilepsy Res. 2014 Aug;108(6):1018-25. doi: 10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2014.05.007. Epub 2014 May 14.

Electroencephalographic features of familial spontaneous epileptic cats.

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  • 1Division of Veterinary Radiology, Department of Veterinary Science, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, 1-7-1 Kyounanchou, Musashinoshi, Tokyo 180-8602, Japan. Electronic address: disk-hsgw@nvlu.ac.jp.
  • 2Division of Veterinary Radiology, Department of Veterinary Science, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, 1-7-1 Kyounanchou, Musashinoshi, Tokyo 180-8602, Japan.
  • 3Laboratory of Veterinary Clinical Pathobiology, Department of Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yoyoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan.
  • 4Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Department of Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yoyoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan.

Abstract

A feline strain of familial spontaneous epileptic cats (FSECs) with typical limbic seizures was identified in 2010, and have been maintained as a novel animal model of genetic epilepsy. In this study, we characterized the electroencephalographic (EEG) features of FSECs. On scalp EEG under sedation, FSECs showed sporadic, but comparatively frequent interictal discharges dominantly in the uni- or bilateral temporal region. Bemegride activation was performed in order to evaluate the predisposition of epileptogenicity of FSECs. The threshold doses of the first paroxysmal discharge, clinical myoclonus and generalized convulsion in FSECs were significantly lower than those in control cats. Chronic video-intracranial EEG monitoring revealed subclinical or clinical focal seizures with secondarily generalization onset from the unilateral amygdala and/or hippocampus. Clinical generalized seizures were also recorded, but we were unable to detect the onset site. The results of the present study show that FSECs resemble not only feline kindling or the kainic acid model and El mouse, but also human familial or sporadic mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. In addition, our results indicate that FSECs are a natural and valuable model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Animal model; Cats; Electroencephalograph; Genetic epilepsy; Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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