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Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2014 Sep-Oct;59(2):360-6. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2014.04.003. Epub 2014 May 5.

Metabolic syndrome: The association of obesity and unhealthy lifestyle among Malaysian elderly people.

Author information

  • 1Dietetic Program, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
  • 2Dietetic Program, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Electronic address: suzana.shahar@gmail.com.

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its predictors among Malaysian elderly. A total of 343 elderly aged ≥ 60 years residing low cost flats in an urban area in the central of Malaysia were invited to participate in health screening in community centers. Subjects were interviewed to obtain socio demography, health status and behavior data. Anthropometric measurements were also measured. A total of 30 ml fasting blood was taken to determine fasting serum lipid, glucose level and oxidative stress. MetS was classified according to The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. The prevalence of MetS was 43.4%. More women (48.1%) were affected than men (36.3%) (p<0.05). Being obese or overweight was the strongest predictor for MetS in men and women (p<0.05, both gender). High carbohydrate intake increased risk of MetS in men by 2.8 folds. In women, higher fat free mass index, physical inactivity and good appetite increased risk of MetS by 3.9, 2.1 and 2.3 folds respectively. MetS affected almost half of Malaysian elderly being investigated, especially women, and is associated with obesity and unhealthy lifestyle. It is essential to develop preventive and intervention strategies to curb undesirable consequences associated with MetS.

Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

KEYWORDS:

Elderly; Malaysia; Metabolic syndrome; Risk factors

PMID:
24882592
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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