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Eur J Intern Med. 2014 Jul;25(6):511-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ejim.2014.05.002. Epub 2014 May 27.

Polyclonal intravenous immunoglobulin: an important additional strategy in sepsis?

Author information

  • 1Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, S. Andrea University Hospital, Via di Grottarossa 1035-1039, 00189 Rome, Italy. Electronic address: roberta.dirosa@uniroma1.it.
  • 2Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, S. Andrea University Hospital, Via di Grottarossa 1035-1039, 00189 Rome, Italy.

Abstract

Sepsis syndrome is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response to infection potentially leading to acute organ failure and rapid decline to death. Polyclonal intravenous immune globulin, a blood product derived from human donor blood, in addition to antiinfective activities, also exerts a broad antiinflammatory and immunomodulating effect. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been proposed as adjuvant therapy for sepsis even though the clinical studies demonstrating their efficacy and safety are relatively small. Several systematic reviews and meta-analyses of intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in sepsis have been performed. As a result of heterogeneity across studies and inconsistencies in results, the majority have concluded that more evidence, coming from large, well-conducted randomized controlled trials (RCTs), is required. Moreover the appropriate timing of administration and the identification of specific clinical settings represent a key factor to maximizing their beneficial effect. The authors, in this revision, review the basic mechanisms of action of IVIg, the rationale for their use, and their clinical applications.

Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Immunomodulation; Intravenous immunoglobulin; Neonatal sepsis; Sepsis; Septic shock

PMID:
24877856
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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