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Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2014 Aug;91(2):258-66. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.13-0664. Epub 2014 May 27.

Molecular detection of adenoviruses, rhabdoviruses, and paramyxoviruses in bats from Kenya.

Author information

  • 1Division of Viral Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, Kansas; Zoology Department, National Museum, Nairobi, Kenya; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya; Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • 2Division of Viral Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, Kansas; Zoology Department, National Museum, Nairobi, Kenya; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya; Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia sot1@cdc.gov.

Abstract

We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays. Of 217 bat fecal swabs examined, 4 bats were adenovirus DNA-positive, 11 bats were paramyxovirus RNA-positive, and 2 bats were rhabdovirus RNA-positive. Three bats were coinfected by two different viruses. By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking. Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus.

© The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

PMID:
24865685
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4125246
Free PMC Article
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