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J Subst Abuse Treat. 2014 Aug;47(2):113-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2014.03.007. Epub 2014 Apr 13.

Extended-release naltrexone for alcohol and opioid dependence: a meta-analysis of healthcare utilization studies.

Author information

  • 1Oregon State University/Oregon Health & Science University College of Pharmacy, 3303 SW Bond Avenue, CH12C, Portland OR 97239. Electronic address: hartungd@ohsu.edu.
  • 2Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, CB669, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239.
  • 3CODA, 1027 E. Burnside St., Portland, OR 97214.
  • 4Treatment Research Institute, Public Ledger Building, Philadelphia, PA 19106.
  • 5Alkermes, Inc., 852 Winter Street, Waltham, MA 02451.

Abstract

Through improved adherence, once-monthly injectable extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) may provide an advantage over other oral agents approved for alcohol and opioid dependence treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate cost and utilization outcomes between XR-NTX and other pharmacotherapies for treatment of alcohol and opioid dependence. Published studies were identified through comprehensive search of two electronic databases. Studies were included if they compared XR-NTX to other approved medicines and reported economic and healthcare utilization outcomes in patients with opioid or alcohol dependence. We identified five observational studies comparing 1,565 patients using XR-NTX to other therapies over 6 months. Alcohol dependent XR-NTX patients had longer medication refill persistence versus acamprosate and oral naltrexone. Healthcare utilization and costs was generally lower or as low for XR-NTX-treated patients relative to other alcohol dependence agents. Opioid dependent XR-NTX patients had lower inpatient substance abuse-related utilization versus other agents and $8170 lower total cost versus methadone.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol dependence; Naltrexone; Opioid dependence

PMID:
24854219
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4110954
[Available on 2015-08-01]
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