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J Nucl Med. 2014 May 19;55(7):1128-1131. [Epub ahead of print]

An Exocrine Pancreatic Stress Test with 11C-Acetate PET and Secretin Stimulation.

Author information

  • 1Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • 2Pancreas Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland; and.
  • 3Department of Medicine, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York.
  • 4Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland rwahl@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop a noninvasive imaging test of pancreatic exocrine function.

METHODS:

In this pilot study, 5 healthy volunteers underwent two 60-min dynamic 11C-acetate PET studies, one before and one after intravenous secretin administration. Kinetic analysis of the pancreas was performed using a 1-compartment model and an image-derived input function. From summed images, standardized uptake values were measured from the pancreas and the liver, and the pancreas-to-liver ratio was computed.

RESULTS:

The baseline k1 and k2 data for all 5 volunteers were consistent. After secretin stimulation, the k1 and k2 significantly increased (paired t test P = 0.046 and P = 0.023, respectively). In the summed PET images, the pancreas-to-liver ratio decreased (P = 0.037). Increased 11C-acetate activity was observed in the duodenum after secretin stimulation consistent with secretin-induced secretion.

CONCLUSION:

11C-acetate PET studies with secretin stimulation show potential as a noninvasive method for assessing pancreatic exocrine function.

© 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

11C-acetate PET; pancreas; secretin

PMID:
24842893
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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