Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Cell Host Microbe. 2014 May 14;15(5):636-43. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2014.04.007.

Host cell polarity proteins participate in innate immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

Author information

  • 1Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
  • 2Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
  • 3Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
  • 4Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
  • 5Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, Montevideo 11400, Uruguay, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
  • 6Department of Cell and Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
  • 7Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA; Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA; Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
  • 8Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. Electronic address: jengel@medicine.ucsf.edu.

Abstract

The mucosal epithelium consists of polarized cells with distinct apical and basolateral membranes that serve as functional and physical barriers to external pathogens. The apical surface of the epithelium constitutes the first point of contact between mucosal pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and their host. We observed that binding of P. aeruginosa aggregates to the apical surface of polarized cells led to the striking formation of an actin-rich membrane protrusion with inverted polarity, containing basolateral lipids and membrane components. Such protrusions were associated with a spatially localized host immune response to P. aeruginosa aggregates that required bacterial flagella and a type III secretion system apparatus. Host protrusions formed de novo underneath bacterial aggregates and involved the apical recruitment of a Par3/Par6α/aPKC/Rac1 signaling module for a robust, spatially localized host NF-κB response. Our data reveal a role for spatiotemporal epithelial polarity changes in the activation of innate immune responses.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
24832456
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4062193
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk