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Bone. 2014 Jul;64:298-302. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2014.04.027. Epub 2014 May 2.

Fat mass is positively associated with bone mass in relatively thin adolescents: data from the Kitakata Kids Health Study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Public Health, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Oono-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511, Japan. Electronic address: kouda@med.kindai.ac.jp.
  • 2Department of Public Health, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Oono-higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511, Japan.
  • 3Department of Human Life, Jin-ai University, 3-1-1 Ote, Echizen, Fukui 915-0015, Japan.
  • 4Department of Health Promotion and Education, Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University, 3-11 Tsurukabuto, Nada, Kobe 657-8501, Japan.
  • 5Laboratory of Physiological Nutrition, Kagawa Nutrition University, 3-9-21 Chiyoda, Sakado, Saitama 350-0214, Japan.

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have found that higher body weight is associated with better bone health. Body weight consists of both fat mass (FM) and lean soft tissue mass (LSTM). Previous studies have examined the effects of FM levels during childhood on bone health, with conflicting results. In the present study, we investigated the independent contributions of FM to bone mass in Japanese adolescents. Subjects were 235 adolescents aged 15-18 years old in August 2010 and in August 2013 from the Kitakata Kids Health Study in Japan. We obtained cross-sectional data on body composition as well as bone mineral density (BMD). Body composition and BMD were measured using a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanner. We found moderate and positive relationships between FM index and LSTM index (males, r=0.69; females, r=0.44). To verify a potentially additive effect of FM on the variance of bone variables beyond LSTM, we assessed the association between FM index and bone variables after stratification by tertiles of the LSTM index. In the lowest tertile of the LSTM index, FM index was significantly (P<0.05) associated with both femoral neck BMD (males, β=0.48; females, β=0.33) and whole body BMC (males, β=0.41; females, β=0.25). On the other hand, we found no significant associations between FM index and bone variables in other tertiles of the LSTM index. These findings indicate that FM can influence how high bone mass is obtained among relatively thin adolescents, but not among those who are of normal weight or overweight.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Adipocytes; Adolescent; Bone; Densitometry

PMID:
24792957
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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