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Springerplus. 2014 Mar 25;3:159. doi: 10.1186/2193-1801-3-159. eCollection 2014.

Evaluation of proper prescribing of cardiac medications at hospital discharge for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in two Lebanese hospitals.

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  • 1Clinical Associate Professor Lebanese American University, P.O. Box: 36, Byblos, Lebanon.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the major leading cause of death worldwide. The national practice guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) promote the use of several medical therapies for secondary prevention for patients with CAD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether ACS patients, admitted into two tertiary referral medical centers in Beirut, Lebanon, are discharged on optimal medical therapy based on the current AHA/ACC guidelines.

METHODS:

We reviewed the medical records of all patients with ACS who were admitted to the coronary care units (CCU) of two hospitals in Beirut, Lebanon between May and August 2012. Discharge prescriptions were reviewed and rating for the appropriateness of discharge cardiac medications was based on the AHA/ACC guidelines. We assessed whether patients were discharged on antiplatelet therapy, β-blockers, angiotensin converting enzymes inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), statins, and nitrates, unless contraindicated or not tolerated. In addition, we assessed whether patients and/or their caregivers were counseled about their disease(s) and discharge medications.

RESULTS:

186 patients with a mean age of 63 ± 11.78 years, 70.4% of which were males, were admitted with ACS and were included in the study. Fifty three (28.5%) patients had ST elevation MI (STEMI), 64 (34.4%) had non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and 69 (37.1%) had unstable angina (USA). Sixty two patients (33.3%) were treated with medical therapy and 124 patients (66.7%) underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Among eligible patients, 98.9% were discharged on aspirin, 89.1% on dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin + thienopyridine or ticagrelor), 90.5% on a β-blocker, 81.9% on an ACEI or ARB, 89.8% on a statin, and 19.4% on nitroglycerin. Overall, 62.9% of the patients received the optimal cardiovascular drug therapy (the combination of dual antiplatelet therapy, a β-blocker, an ACEIs or an ARB, and a statin), 55.1% were counseled on their disease state(s) and drug therapy, and 92.2% and 55.9% were counseled on smoking cessation and life style changes, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

In patients admitted with ACS, discharge cardiac medications are prescribed at suboptimal rates. Education of healthcare providers and implementation of ACS discharge protocols may help improve compliance with ACC/AHA guidelines. In addition, clinicians should be encouraged to provide adequate patient counseling.

KEYWORDS:

ACS; CAD; Cardiac medications; Coronary artery disease; Secondary prevention

PMID:
24790814
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC4000588
Free PMC Article
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