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J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2014 May;75(3):496-509.

DSM-IV antisocial personality disorder and conduct disorder: evidence for taxonic structures among individuals with and without substance use disorders in the general population.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York.
  • 2Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Intramural Division of Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland.
  • 3Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The categorical-dimensional status of DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) conduct disorder (CD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is a source of controversy. This study examined whether the underlying structure of DSM-IV CD and ASPD was dimensional or categorical (taxonic) among individuals with and without substance use disorders.

METHOD:

Using a national large representative survey of U.S. adults (n = 43,093), taxometric analyses of DSM-IV CD and ASPD diagnostic criteria were conducted on the total sample and among those with and without substance use disorders.

RESULTS:

Results of three taxometric procedures were consistent in showing that the structures underlying DSM-IV CD and ASPD were clearly taxonic in the total sample and among individuals with and without substance use disorders. Comparison curve fit indices exceeded 0.57 for each model.

CONCLUSIONS:

Taxonic findings of the present study were in contrast to the dimensional results of prior taxometric research among incarcerated samples with substantial comorbidity of antisocial syndromes and substance use disorders. Results supported the categorical representation and diagnostic thresholds of ASPD and CD as defined in DSM-IV and DSM-5. That the structure of ASPD and CD may be taxonic suggests that further research on these disorders use group comparative designs in which samples with and without these disorders are compared in terms of sociodemographic and clinical correlates, comorbidity, and treatment utilization. The taxonic structure of ASPD and CD may contribute to future research on causal processes through which these antisocial syndromes develop.

PMID:
24766762
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4002863
[Available on 2015-05-01]
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