Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Mar Pollut Bull. 2014 Aug 30;85(2):487-93. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.04.001. Epub 2014 Apr 20.

Simulated distribution and ecotoxicity-based assessment of chemically-dispersed oil in Tokyo Bay.

Author information

  • 1Faculty of Fisheries, Kagoshima University, 4-50-20 Shimoarata, Kagoshima, Japan. Electronic address: koyama@fish.kagoshima-u.ac.jp.
  • 2Faculty of Fisheries, Kagoshima University, 4-50-20 Shimoarata, Kagoshima, Japan.
  • 3National Maritime Research Institute, 6-38-1, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 4Institute of Marine Fisheries and Oceanology, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of the Philippines Visayas, Miagao, Iloilo 5023, Philippines.

Abstract

To assess risks of chemically-dispersed oil to marine organisms, oil concentrations in the water were simulated using a hypothetical spill accident in Tokyo Bay. Simulated oil concentrations were then compared with the short-term no-observed effect concentration (NOEC), 0.01 mg/L, obtained through toxicity tests using marine diatoms, amphipod and fish. Area of oil concentrations higher than the NOEC were compared with respect to use and non-use of dispersant. Results of the simulation show relatively faster dispersion near the mouth of the bay compared to its inner sections which is basically related to its stronger water currents. Interestingly, in the inner bay, a large area of chemically-dispersed oil has concentrations higher than the NOEC. It seems emulsifying oil by dispersant increases oil concentrations, which could lead to higher toxicity to aquatic organisms. When stronger winds occur, however, the difference in toxic areas between use and non-use of dispersant is quite small.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Dispersed oil; Ecotoxicity-based; Marine organisms; Simulation

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk