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Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2014 Jul;58(7):3689-96. doi: 10.1128/AAC.02798-13. Epub 2014 Apr 21.

Akt inhibitor MK2206 prevents influenza pH1N1 virus infection in vitro.

Author information

  • 1Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
  • 2Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
  • 3Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
  • 4Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, National Institute for Health and Welfare, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
  • 5Institute of Immunology, Centre de Recherche Public de la Santé/Laboratoire National de Santé, Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
  • 6Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
  • 7Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
  • 8VIB Inflammation Research Center and Department of Biomedical Molecular Biology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
  • 9Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology and Gruss-Lipper Biophotonics Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.
  • 10Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Department of Environmental Research, Siauliai University, Siauliai, Lithuania denis.kainov@helsinki.fi.

Abstract

The influenza pH1N1 virus caused a global flu pandemic in 2009 and continues manifestation as a seasonal virus. Better understanding of the virus-host cell interaction could result in development of better prevention and treatment options. Here we show that the Akt inhibitor MK2206 blocks influenza pH1N1 virus infection in vitro. In particular, at noncytotoxic concentrations, MK2206 alters Akt signaling and inhibits endocytic uptake of the virus. Interestingly, MK2206 is unable to inhibit H3N2, H7N9, and H5N1 viruses, indicating that pH1N1 evolved specific requirements for efficient infection. Thus, Akt signaling could be exploited further for development of better therapeutics against pH1N1 virus.

Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

PMID:
24752266
[PubMed - in process]
PMCID:
PMC4068572
Free PMC Article
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