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Eur Heart J. 2014 Nov 7;35(42):2972-9. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehu153. Epub 2014 Apr 16.

Association of circulating endothelial microparticles with cardiometabolic risk factors in the Framingham Heart Study.

Author information

  • 1INSERM, U970, Paris Cardiovascular Research Center - PARCC, 56 Rue Leblanc, 75737 Paris cedex 15, France Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S970 Paris, France.
  • 2Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 3Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 4Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 5Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 6Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA.
  • 7Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 8Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 9Section of Hematology/Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 10Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA Sections of Preventive Medicine and Cardiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
  • 11INSERM, U970, Paris Cardiovascular Research Center - PARCC, 56 Rue Leblanc, 75737 Paris cedex 15, France Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S970 Paris, France chantal.boulanger@inserm.fr thomas.j.wang@vanderbilt.edu.
  • 12Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2220 Pierce Avenue, 383 Preston Research Building, Nashville, TN 37232, USA chantal.boulanger@inserm.fr thomas.j.wang@vanderbilt.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relation of endothelial microparticles (EMPs) with cardiometabolic risk in the community.

BACKGROUND:

Circulating EMPs are small membrane vesicles released after endothelial cell injury. Endothelial microparticles are reportedly increased among individuals with a high burden of cardiovascular risk factors. However, prior investigations have been limited to small, highly selected samples.

METHODS:

We studied 844 individuals without a history of cardiovascular disease in the Framingham Offspring cohort (mean age 66 ± 9 years, 57% women). We used standardized flow cytometry methods to identify and quantify circulating CD144+ and CD31+/CD41- EMPs. We then used multivariable regression analyses to investigate the relations of EMP phenotypes with cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors.

RESULTS:

In multivariable analyses, the following cardiovascular risk factors were associated with one or more of the circulating EMP populations: hypertension (P = 0.025 for CD144+,), elevated triglycerides (P = 0.002 for CD144+, P < 0.0001 for CD31+/CD41-), and metabolic syndrome (P < 0.0001 for CD144+,). Overall, each tertile increase in the Framingham risk score corresponded to a 9% increase in log-CD31+/CD41- EMPs (P = 0.022). Furthermore, the presence of hypertriglyceridaemic waist status was associated with 38% higher levels of CD144+ EMPs (P < 0.0001) and 46% higher levels of CD31+/CD41- EMPs (P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

In a large community-based sample, circulating EMP levels were associated with the presence of cardiometabolic risk factors, particularly dyslipidaemia. These data underscore the potential influence of high-risk metabolic profiles on endothelial integrity.

Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular risk factors; Endothelium; Microparticles

PMID:
24742886
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4223610
Free PMC Article
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