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Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi. 2014 Feb;35(2):129-33.

[Relations between problems on sleeping and suicidal behaviors in middle school students].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

  • 1Anhui Provincial Laboratory Population Health and Eugenics, Department of Marteral, Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032, China.
  • 2Anhui Provincial Laboratory Population Health and Eugenics, Department of Marteral, Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032, China. Email: fbtao@126.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To understand the epidemiological characteristics and possible associations between sleeping problems and suicidal behaviors among middle school students.

METHODS:

A total of 13 817 middle school students were selected in Shenyang,Xinxiang, Chongqing and Guangzhou cities and cluster sampling method was used. Questionnaires would include information on demographics, quality of sleep, psychopathological status and suicidal behaviors. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality index (PSQI) and Adolescent Multidimensional Sub-health Questionnaire (MSQA) were used to assess the quality of sleep and psychosomatic symptoms, respectively. Rates on sleeping problems and suicidal behaviors were compared in students with specific characteristics. Effects related to sleeping problems and suicidal behaviors were analyzed, using the multivariate logistic regression model.

RESULTS:

The overall prevalence of problems related to sleeping among middle school students was 26.5%. 28.2% of the girls and 35.2% of senior students reported as having more sleeping problems. Rates on suicide related ideation, planning and attempts were 16.6%, 9.6% and 4.7% , respectively. Girls reported more suicide ideation than boys. However, no gender differences were found in suicide planning or attempted suicide. It also suggested that the incidence of the suicidal behavior among students with sleeping problems was significantly higher than students without sleeping problems. Data from Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that sleeping problems appeared as independent risk factors on suicidal behavior. Higher PSQI scores seemed coincide with the increased risk of suicidal behaviors. Students having sleeping time less than 5 hours per day showed higher risk of suicidal behaviors.

CONCLUSION:

Problems on sleeping seemed a strong risk factor for suicidal behaviors among middle school students. Improvement on the quality of sleep and reasonable arrangement of sleeping time could help prevent related suicidal behaviors among middle school students.

PMID:
24739549
[PubMed - in process]
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