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Physiother Can. 2014 Winter;66(1):91-107. doi: 10.3138/ptc.2012-45BC.

Occupational physical loading tasks and knee osteoarthritis: a review of the evidence.

Author information

  • 1School of Population and Public Health.
  • 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver ; Arthritis Research Centre of Canada, Richmond, B.C.

Abstract

in English, French

Purpose : To perform a systematic review with best evidence synthesis examining the literature on the relationship between occupational loading tasks and knee osteoarthritis (OA).

METHODS:

Two databases were searched to identify articles published between 1946 and April, 2011. Eligible studies were those that (1) included adults reporting on their employment history; (2) measured individuals' exposure to work-related activities with heavy loading in the knee joint; and (3) identified presence of knee OA (determined by X-ray), cartilage defects associated with knee OA (identified by magnetic resonance imaging), or joint replacement surgery.

RESULTS:

A total of 32 articles from 31 studies met the inclusion criteria. We found moderate evidence that combined heavy lifting and kneeling is a risk factor for knee OA, with odds ratios (OR) varying from 1.8 to 7.9, and limited evidence for heavy lifting (OR=1.4-7.3), kneeling (OR=1.5-6.9), stair climbing (OR=1.6-5.1), and occupational groups (OR=1.4-4.7) as risk factors. When examined by sex, moderate level evidence of knee OA was found in men; however, the evidence in women was limited.

CONCLUSIONS:

Further high-quality prospective studies are warranted to provide further evidence on the role of occupational loading tasks in knee OA, particularly in women.

KEYWORDS:

knee joint; occupational diseases; occupations; osteoarthritis

PMID:
24719516
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3941140
Free PMC Article
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