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J Infect Chemother. 2014 Apr;20(4):243-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jiac.2013.12.003. Epub 2014 Jan 24.

Comparison of broad-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from dogs and humans in Hokkaido, Japan.

Author information

  • 1Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Food Safety, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan.
  • 2Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan.
  • 3Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Food Safety, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan. Electronic address: tamuray@rakuno.ac.jp.

Abstract

Resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins (BSCs) in Enterobacteriaceae in companion animals has become a great concern for public health. To estimate the dissemination of BSC-resistant bacteria between dog and human, we examined the BSC-resistance determinants of and genetic similarities between 69 BSC-resistant Escherichia coli isolates derived from canine rectal swabs (n = 28) and human clinical samples (n = 41). Some E. coli isolates possessed blaTEM-1b (14 canine and 16 human isolates), blaCTx-M-2 (6 human isolates), blaCTx-M-14 (3 canine and 14 human isolates), blaCTx-M-27 (1 canine and 15 human isolates), and blaCMY-2 (11 canine and 3 human isolates). The possession of CTX-M-type β-lactamases was significantly more frequent in human isolates, whereas CMY-2 was more common in canine isolates. Bacterial typing methods (phylogenetic typing, O-antigen serotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) showed little clonal relationship between canine isolates and human isolates. Plasmid analysis and Southern blotting indicated that the plasmids encoding CMY-2 were similar among canine and human isolates. Based on the differences in the major β-lactamase and the divergence of bacterial types between canine and human isolates, it seems that clonal dissemination of BSC-resistant E. coli between canines and humans is limited. The similarity of the CMY-2-encoding plasmid suggests that plasmid-mediated β-lactamase gene transmission plays a role in interspecies diffusion of BSC-resistant E. coli between dog and human.

Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

AmpC β-lactamase; Antimicrobial resistance; Dog; Escherichia coli; Extended spectrum β-lactamase

PMID:
24709044
[PubMed - in process]
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