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Carbohydr Polym. 2014 May 25;105:63-9. doi: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2014.01.068. Epub 2014 Jan 29.

In situ cross-linked polysaccharide hydrogel as extracellular matrix mimics for antibiotics delivery.

Author information

  • 1Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer Materials of Ministry Education, Institute of Polymer Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China.
  • 2Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer Materials of Ministry Education, Institute of Polymer Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China. Electronic address: zhangxinge@nankai.edu.cn.
  • 3Metabolic Disease Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China.

Abstract

Many synthetic hydrogels for drug delivery have been based on polyethylene glycol which is non-natural, non-biodegradable and only terminal-functionalizable. The polysaccharides dextran and chitosan not only are highly hydrophilic, biodegradable and pendant-functionalizable, but also more closely mimic the nature extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans. Here, a biomimetic hydrogel based on chitosan and dextran was synthesized by the Michael addition reaction. The hydrogels have good swelling and cytocompatibility against NIH3T3. Moreover, vancomycin-loaded hydrogels were formed in situ, and could kill both Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria, indicating that the hydrogel as a wound dressing could provide protection against bacterial infection. Notably, the drug release was controlled via modifying the compositions. Therefore, the biomimetic polysaccharide hydrogels as a promising carrier have potential application for wound healing.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Antibacterial; Hydrogel; Polysaccharide; Wound dressing

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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